Coexistence in Medieval Spain: Jews, Christians, and Muslims

Por: Coursera . en: , ,

  • Introduction to Medieval Spain and Coexistence (418-711 CE)
    • This week introduces the idea of co-existence in medieval Spain. We begin our study of medieval Spain by briefly viewing Roman Spain and then learning about the Visigoths. Supplemental information places medieval Iberia within the contexts of European, Byzantine, and Islamic civilizations. The honors section of the course introduces "The Historian's Craft" and the task of "viewing".
  • DEVELOPING DYNAMIC CULTURES: ISLAMIC AL-ANDALUS AND JEWISH SEFARAD (711-1212 CE)
    • In this section of the course, we advance our investigation of medieval Spain to learn about Islamic al-Andalus (Islamic Spain) and Jewish Sefarad (Jewish Spain). This includes a study of the Islamic conquest of Visigothic Spain and the subsequent development of the Umayyad Dynasty. We evaluate the complexities of conflicts between religious groups and within religious groups. We witness interfaith collaboration. Islamic sciences are presented as is the Golden Age of the Spanish Jews. We view Islamic art and architecture. Lastly, in our honors section we continue with our study of the Historian's Craft and the task of "reading".
  • Forging A Christian Future: Christian Spain (711-1212 CE) and the Castilian Ascent In Spain (1212-1347 CE)
    • First, we continue with an investigation of the third principal culture of Iberian Peninsula -- Spanish Christian Hispania. We seek out more specific examples of the Christian kingdom's impact on political, religious, social, intellectual, and economic issues. Next, we examine the rise of the Spanish Christian Kingdom of Castile and Leon and the impact of King Alfonso X "The Learned". We study how Spanish Christians created culture through material objects and architecture. In addition, we explore the complications of Christians governing religious minorities in their lands. The honors section of the course continues with our study of the Historian's Craft and the task of "analyzing".
  • Creating Conversos and Rejecting Religious Diversity: Catholic Spain (1347-1502 CE)
    • This section of the course presents the end of coexistence in medieval Spain, which was characterized by the creation of new types of peoples (conversos, Jewish converts to Christianity), religious intolerance and expulsions. Multiple examples of the fluctuations in the relationships of Jews, Christians, and Muslims, are examined as Catholic Spain took shape. Special attention is also directed to Spanish archives that preserve this history. We take a closer look at the end of convivencia in the city of Plasencia, Spain, and view a digital video narration. As the Spanish Middle Ages did not occur in a vacuum, we share with you eight scholarly endeavors from the "Global Middle Ages" Project. The honors section of the course continues with our study of the Historian's Craft and the task of "reflecting" and features the music of the Texas Early Music Project.
  • Interpreting Iberia's Past: Our Evaluation of the Evidence
    • The final section of the course prompts students in the Honors Track to interpret and evaluate a historical artifact from medieval Spain (a material object, architecture, or a manuscript). This peer-reviewed project is not a required to complete the course as a regular student.

Plataforma